Correction: Testing Innocence story

November 15, 2019, 11:04 PM2 min read In an Oct. 18 story about an executed man’s daughter’s efforts to exonerate him in a 1985 killing in Tennessee, The Associated Press erroneously reported that she is seeking DNA testing on a Missouri man charged in a separate killing. She is seeking DNA testing on a pair…

By , in Uncategorized on .

November 15, 2019, 11:04 PM

2 min read

In an Oct. 18 story about an executed man’s daughter’s efforts to exonerate him in a 1985 killing in Tennessee, The Associated Press erroneously reported that she is seeking DNA testing on a Missouri man charged in a separate killing. She is seeking DNA testing on a pair of men’s underwear that was found at the Tennessee crime scene, and she and her lawyer have suggested that the Missouri man could be a suspect in that killing. The AP also misidentified her as April Sedley. Her name is April Alley.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Daughter of executed man seeks new DNA evidence testing

Thirteen years after Sedley Alley was executed for a 1985 murder in Tennessee, his daughter is seeking DNA evidence testing in an effort to exonerate her father, and she suggests that a Missouri man charged in a 2018 killing could be a suspect

CLAYTON, Mo. (AP) — Thirteen years after Sedley Alley was executed for a 1985 killing in Tennessee, his daughter is seeking DNA evidence testing in an effort to exonerate her father suggests that a Missouri man charged in a 2018 killing could be a suspect.

Innocence Project co-founder Barry Scheck represents Alley’s daughter, April Alley.

Scheck told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that Missouri authorities say Thomas Bruce took an avionics course in Millington, Tennessee, around the time that Suzanne Collins, a 19-year-old Marine, was killed in Millington. Bruce matches a vague suspect description distributed by police.

Bruce is jailed in St. Louis County, accused of sexually assaulting two women and killing a third in a Catholic Supply store last November.

Scheck argued in October that she should be allowed to petition for new DNA testing of a pair of men’s underwear recovered at the Tennessee scene on behalf of her father’s estate.

Bruce’s attorney declined comment.


ABC News

Recommended articles